Cities, Landscape & Environment

Beyond Petropolis

Designing a Practical Utopia in Nueva Loja


  • Preface by
  • Michael Sorkin
  •  
  • Essays by
  • Matthias Altwicker, Ana María Durán Calisto, Patrick Radden Keefe, David Leven, Michael Sorkin Achva Benzinberg Stein, and Osvaldo Paladines Zurita
  •  
  • Edited by
  • Michael Sorkin, Ana María Durán Calisto, and Matthias Altwicker
  •  

Beyond Petropolis

Designing a Practical Utopia in Nueva Loja

Cities, Landscape & Environment

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Beyond Petropolis 3Beyond Petropolis 4Beyond Petropolis 5Beyond Petropolis 6Beyond Petropolis 7Beyond Petropolis 8Beyond Petropolis 9Beyond Petropolis 10Beyond Petropolis 11Beyond Petropolis 12Beyond Petropolis 13Beyond Petropolis 14Beyond Petropolis 15Beyond Petropolis 16Beyond Petropolis 17Beyond Petropolis 18Beyond Petropolis 19
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contributors

especifications

description

biographies

  • contributors

  • Preface by Michael Sorkin
  • Essays by Matthias Altwicker, Ana María Durán Calisto, Patrick Radden Keefe, David Leven, Michael Sorkin Achva Benzinberg Stein, and Osvaldo Paladines Zurita
  • Edited by Michael Sorkin, Ana María Durán Calisto, and Matthias Altwicker
  • specifications

  • Edition: Hardcover in slipcase
  • Size: 8.26 x 11.6 in / 210 x 297 mm
  • Format: Landscape
  • Pages: 368
  • Publication date: 09-2015
  • Language: English with spanish text
  • Photographs: 210
  • Illustrations: 780
  • Weight: 2.2 kgs
  • Rights: World Rights Available
  • Price: USD $50 / €45 / ₤32
  • ISBN: 978-988-16194-2-6
  • description

  • Each year, the Graduate Program in Urban Design at The City College of New York travels to a city somewhere in the world that is experiencing a revelatory form of stress. In January of 2006 – joined by students and faculty from the Universidad Catolica in Quito and from the architecture and landscape programs at CCNY – the destination of the group was the small town of Nueva Loja in the Amazon basin of Ecuador. At the time, a population of around 100,000 was expanding exponentially. Nueva Loja was the fastest growing municipality in the country. There was one reason for this: the oil boom. Indeed, almost everyone calls the place “Lago Agrio” – Bitter Lake, after the town in Texas that houses the headquarters of Texaco, the first petroleum giant on the scene. There’s little irony in this name. As the endless lawsuit against Chevron, Texaco’s successor, has made abundantly clear, Lago’s growth has come at the cost of extremely bitter consequences. The group was inspired to visit by a more particular observation: Lago’s projected rate of growth would see the population exceed 150,000 at just the moment the oil ran out. And so, they decided to investigate what might happen then, how Nueva Loja could move beyond oil to an economy and urban pattern that embrace renewed harmony with the natural environment and is dedicated to creating an intensely humane and supportive place for its inhabitants. The projects in this volume represent a series of propositions for such a place. They are utopian in that they look to a time of harmony and prosperity but intensely practical in that they stem from the specifics of people and place and utilize simple, historical, and local technologies, not any magic fix. A collaboration between The City College of New York. Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture and Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers
  • biographies

  • Michael Sorkin received his architectural training at Harvard and MIT and holds degrees from the University of Chicago and Columbia. He is the principal of the Michael Sorkin Studio in New York City. He is founding president of Terreform, a non-profit organization dedicated to research and urban intervention. He is president of the Institute for Urban Design; Distinguished Professor of Architecture and the Director of the Graduate Urban Design Program at The City College of New York (where he has taught since 2000), Professor of Urbanism and Director of the Institute of Urbanism at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna (1993 to 2000), and he has been a professor at numerous schools of architecture. He lectures around the world, is the author of several hundred articles, and is currently a contributing editor at Architectural Record.

    Matthias Altwicker is a principal of AB Architekten in New York City and an associate professor at the School of Architecture and Design at the New York Institute of Technology. His teaching and practice focuses on affordable and environmentally conscious housing and neighborhood development. He has designed sustainable housing for the Long Island Housing Partnership, collaborated with the Long Island Power Authority to investigate photovoltaic integration with existing suburban homes, and developed self-sufficient, expandable school prototypes for Kenya. The firm acts as an urban design consultant to the Regional Plan Association (NYC), the Nassau County Planning Federation (Long Island), and the Potsdam Housing Collective (Germany).

    Ana María Durán Calisto graduated from the Liberal Arts School of the Universidad San Francisco de Quito, majoring in anthropology with a minor in comparative literature and art history, and received a scholarship to pursue studies in architecture and historic preservation at the University of Pennsylvania. She established the design firm Estudio A0 with her partner Jaskran Singh Kalirai. She is a professor at the Universidad Católica del Ecuador and has been invited to be a guest professor at the GSD, University of Harvard, and the GSAPP, University of Columbia. She was director of the XV Quito Pan-American Architecture Biennale. Her essays have been published internationally and she has lectured at several American and European academic institutions.

    David Leven is a partner at LEVENBETTS, a New York City–based architecture practice begun in 1997 with Stella Betts. The work of LEVENBETTS, which has won several awards, has been published in various design magazines, books, and in a monograph (Princeton Architectural Press, 2008). David has lectured widely at a variety of institutions and he is currently an Associate Professor and Director of the Graduate Architecture program at Parsons the New School for Design. He holds a Bachelor of Arts from Colgate University, a Master of Architecture degree from Yale University, and attended the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies.

  • other editions available

Each year, the Graduate Program in Urban Design at The City College of New York travels to a city somewhere in the world that is experiencing a revelatory form of stress. In January of 2006 – joined by students and faculty from the Universidad Catolica in Quito and from the architecture and landscape programs at CCNY – the destination of the group was the small town of Nueva Loja in the Amazon basin of Ecuador. At the time, a population of around 100,000 was expanding exponentially. Nueva Loja was the fastest growing municipality in the country. There was one reason for this: the oil boom. Indeed, almost everyone calls the place “Lago Agrio” – Bitter Lake, after the town in Texas that houses the headquarters of Texaco, the first petroleum giant on the scene. There’s little irony in this name. As the endless lawsuit against Chevron, Texaco’s successor, has made abundantly clear, Lago’s growth has come at the cost of extremely bitter consequences. The group was inspired to visit by a more particular observation: Lago’s projected rate of growth would see the population exceed 150,000 at just the moment the oil ran out. And so, they decided to investigate what might happen then, how Nueva Loja could move beyond oil to an economy and urban pattern that embrace renewed harmony with the natural environment and is dedicated to creating an intensely humane and supportive place for its inhabitants. The projects in this volume represent a series of propositions for such a place. They are utopian in that they look to a time of harmony and prosperity but intensely practical in that they stem from the specifics of people and place and utilize simple, historical, and local technologies, not any magic fix. A collaboration between The City College of New York. Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture and Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers

  • Preface by Michael Sorkin
  • Essays by Matthias Altwicker, Ana María Durán Calisto, Patrick Radden Keefe, David Leven, Michael Sorkin Achva Benzinberg Stein, and Osvaldo Paladines Zurita
  • Edited by Michael Sorkin, Ana María Durán Calisto, and Matthias Altwicker

Contributors Biographies

Michael Sorkin received his architectural training at Harvard and MIT and holds degrees from the University of Chicago and Columbia. He is the principal of the Michael Sorkin Studio in New York City. He is founding president of Terreform, a non-profit organization dedicated to research and urban intervention. He is president of the Institute for Urban Design; Distinguished Professor of Architecture and the Director of the Graduate Urban Design Program at The City College of New York (where he has taught since 2000), Professor of Urbanism and Director of the Institute of Urbanism at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna (1993 to 2000), and he has been a professor at numerous schools of architecture. He lectures around the world, is the author of several hundred articles, and is currently a contributing editor at Architectural Record.

Matthias Altwicker is a principal of AB Architekten in New York City and an associate professor at the School of Architecture and Design at the New York Institute of Technology. His teaching and practice focuses on affordable and environmentally conscious housing and neighborhood development. He has designed sustainable housing for the Long Island Housing Partnership, collaborated with the Long Island Power Authority to investigate photovoltaic integration with existing suburban homes, and developed self-sufficient, expandable school prototypes for Kenya. The firm acts as an urban design consultant to the Regional Plan Association (NYC), the Nassau County Planning Federation (Long Island), and the Potsdam Housing Collective (Germany).

Ana María Durán Calisto graduated from the Liberal Arts School of the Universidad San Francisco de Quito, majoring in anthropology with a minor in comparative literature and art history, and received a scholarship to pursue studies in architecture and historic preservation at the University of Pennsylvania. She established the design firm Estudio A0 with her partner Jaskran Singh Kalirai. She is a professor at the Universidad Católica del Ecuador and has been invited to be a guest professor at the GSD, University of Harvard, and the GSAPP, University of Columbia. She was director of the XV Quito Pan-American Architecture Biennale. Her essays have been published internationally and she has lectured at several American and European academic institutions.

David Leven is a partner at LEVENBETTS, a New York City–based architecture practice begun in 1997 with Stella Betts. The work of LEVENBETTS, which has won several awards, has been published in various design magazines, books, and in a monograph (Princeton Architectural Press, 2008). David has lectured widely at a variety of institutions and he is currently an Associate Professor and Director of the Graduate Architecture program at Parsons the New School for Design. He holds a Bachelor of Arts from Colgate University, a Master of Architecture degree from Yale University, and attended the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies.

  • Edition:Hardcover in slipcase
  • Size:8.26 x 11.6 in / 210 x 297 mm
  • Format:Landscape
  • Pages:368
  • Publication date: 09-2015
  • Language:English with spanish text
  • Photographs:210
  • Illustrations:780
  • Weight:2.2 kgs
  • Rights:World Rights Available
  • Price:USD $50 / €45 / ₤32
  • ISBN:978-988-16194-2-6